Huawei Mate 20 X gaming benchmarks: GameBench Labs reveals frame rates for top games

Huawei launched the Mate 20 X today with a simple marketing claim: this is a smartphone dedicated to the needs of gamers. But such claims need evidence and that's why Huawei (a GameBench client) sent a pre-release device over to our new testing department, GameBench Labs. We tested the phone's graphical performance across three popular and computationally demanding mobile titles that Huawei nominated: NBA 2K18 by 2K, Mobile Legends: Bang Bang by Moonton, and PUBG Mobile by Tencent Games. Read on to see how the Mate 20 X fared compared to the Apple iPhone Xs Max and Samsung Galaxy Note9.

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Introducing GameBench Labs: Providing verified performance results to device makers and game studios

GameBench is rapidly growing in popularity as a mobile testing tool, which people can use for any purpose they like. It's great to see our software being used by phone enthusiasts like XDA for benchmarking, by game studios like Rovio for QA and by device makers like OnePlus for hardware optimisation. At the same time, we've also seen increased demand from our clients for us to offer GameBench as an end-to-end benchmarking service, in which we take charge of testing and publishing authoritative and credible results for their products. In response, after a year of experimenting with publishing ratings via our Reference Data Beta, we're pleased to announce the launch of GameBench Labs! Please read on for more...

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Huawei's 'GPU Turbo' benchmarked: can it beat gaming on pricier phones like the iPhone X?

Huawei’s new software optimisation for mobile gaming, which goes by the name of GPU Turbo, has so far received a skeptical reception in Europe. This is understandable, because Huawei handset owners won't get the GPU Turbo update until later this month (starting with P20, Mate 10 and Honor 10 models), and in the meantime there's been little evidence to support the manufacturer’s bold claims about improved performance and power consumption.

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Why is Apple hiding its performance issues?

Following the badly-handled iPhone throttling controversy and a series of widely-reported bugs in iOS 11, senior people at Apple are finally being forced to acknowledge that something is going wrong with the fundamental quality of their products. But are we just talking about clumsy management and poor pre-release testing? Or is it possible that Apple's bugs are actually helping the company to mask a more damaging truth about the underlying performance and battery life of its phones, especially relative to Android-based rivals?

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Is it too early to care about 120fps mobile gaming?

It's easy to dismiss 120fps mobile gaming as a curiosity that is only available to owners of a handful of premium devices -- notably the iPad Pro (10.5 and 12.9) and the Razer Phone. But the truth is that this sudden increase in the smoothness and responsiveness of animation (twice the standard maximum of 60 frames per second) is already supported by some of the biggest studios and mobile games.

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